Kindle Unlimited Fills One Writer’s Voids

Amazon.com read my mind.

With Amazon Prime, I was never content checking out a maximum of one book per month. I’m a serial user at the public library. Prime put me on a strict reading diet.

I wanted to use an e-book for a research question, needing it only briefly. Or, I wanted to check out the finished product a publisher (or indie author) offered. Not even to read the whole thing, but just to preview what the person or company seems like.

Kindle Unlimited fills all those voids at $9.99 per month. There’s a 30-day free trial right now. 

No limit on monthly check-outs? Up to 10 books at a time? Cool!

Plus…(and I’m sure I read this right) authors will get a royalty if you read even 10 percent of their titles before returning.

I’m in, with the hope that Amazon will create a yearly fee to reward early-bird users. 

 

 

 

Thanking Baseball Author Ray Robinson

This far-prettier specimen was priced above $25 on eBay. My copy, with numerous creases and other signs of love, is priceless.

This far-prettier specimen was priced above $25 on eBay. My copy, with numerous creases and other signs of love, is priceless.

I still have it.

I have the 60-cent paperback entitled Baseball Stars of 1971. I bought it from the Scholastic Book Club. I read the catalog everyone got at school. Then I counted out the nickels and dimes.

Years ago, I found Robinson’s address. I thanked him for making me want to read AND write. This book is the first complete book I remember reading again and again. (Yes, he wrote back.)

Words matter.

So do writers.

Who should you be thanking today?

 

Writers: Use Your Public Library’s Best-Kept Research Secret

nonfictionAwardRight where you live.

Someone who’ll save you time researching any topic you want.

No, it’s not a website.

Stop at your public library’s children’s department. Find a non-fiction book on your desired topic.

Don’t say you’re too old for children’s books.

Children’s authors take complex subjects and make them easy to read. Get an introduction on any subject through children’s nonfiction. They’ll hit the high points for you, giving you a jump on the competition (or that deadline). Save time. Save money.

Look at the children’s titles as a more-fun version of CliffsNotes.

Believe in Blurb-Review Karma!

You don’t need to be a celebrity.

Exhibit A for books making a difference. Happy birthday, Michael Nobbs!

Exhibit A for books making a difference. Happy birthday, Michael Nobbs!

You don’t need a blog as your megaphone.

You don’t need to be asked.

Has a book made a difference in your life?

Forget the essay. Say how it made you feel. Why does the book work for you?

There are places to speak up. Speak out. The author (or book’s) Facebook page. A website. Amazon.com. Goodreads. One sentences can move mountains. Or a sales meter, at least.

This isn’t to make the author obliged to you. This isn’t about having a personal interaction with the author. This is about being the one voice saying, “Yes, it’s good. Wait until you see how it makes you feel!” 

Why post that blurb?

Because you’ll be creating, too, finishing a project soon. You’ll want someone to notice your work, to feel something over what you made yourself.

Karma keeps score.

Channeling Seth Godin’s Gratitude

What a way to start a week!

Seth Godin’s Monday blog was entitled “The artist who dances on the edge.”

Seth offers words everyone should read.

Read, then adapt.

Make the words, and the attitude, your own.

Too many people believe it’s futile to offer praise. Doesn’t the artist (and writers and authors count) know he’s doing well?

That’s not the point.

Is the artist’s work meaningful to you? Tell them why. There’s no need to have a speech prepared.

“Thank you. That gives me hope.”

Such a tiny effort could keep those artists making art. It’s not about the money. They’re in it to matter. Matter to you and the world.

Gratitude is creativity, too. Thank you, Seth!

Forget The Outline! Write Your Jacket Flap Copy

I just found this intriguing website: www.jacketflap.com So many great perspectives on today's fast-changing children's lit world!

I just found this intriguing website: http://www.jacketflap.com
So many great perspectives on today’s fast-changing children’s lit world!

Start at the end.

Don’t get bogged down by your former high school teacher’s ancient definition of “outline.”

Could you describe your book idea in a succinct way, fitting the preview on your future book jacket?

See how it feels. I’m still striving to meet that New Year’s resolution:

Think less, write more!