Yoga, the evil twin (and the author)

No evil twins here! Yoga and the Evil Twin Full disclosure: the twin in question is more misguided than evil. But the phrase 'evil twin' is probably what got you here, proving that sometimes hyperbole is good. This week at my yoga class, I noticed (again) that the same move is often easier to perform on one side of my body than the other. (Example: stand on one foot, raising the other leg straight in front of you. Now reverse the feet. Is one side more wobbly?)  I've noticed the phenomenon for years. But today, for the first time, I wondered if the

No evil twins here! By lululemon athletica (Flickr: Yoga Journal Conference) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

(It’s “sleep late” day at the blog. Oops. I mean, “First Ever Guest Post!” day. I’m proud to introduce my wife. Grateful applause follows…)

by Diana Star Helmer

Full disclosure: the headlined twin is more misguided than evil. But the phrase ‘evil twin’ is probably what got you here, proving that sometimes hyperbole is good.

This week at my yoga class, I noticed (again) that the same move is often easier to perform on one side of my body than the other. (Example: stand on one foot, raising the other leg straight in front of you. Now reverse the feet. Is one side more wobbly?)

I’ve noticed the phenomenon for years. But today, for the first time, I wondered if the “good” and “bad” sides go deeper than merely physical. A while back, yoga helped me figure out that my “bad” side is actually overworked. My “good” side feels good because it’s lazy, forcing the other side to work harder! No wonder, after years of this, the overworked side started to complain (making it painful, or “bad.”)

I wondered, today, how this might apply to other parts of my life. What other things do I consider strengths, that are really lazy-nesses in disguise?

I sometimes complain of people who write quickly, but don’t edit, and put sloppy work out. I’m the opposite. I edit till the cows come home, eat their dinner, watch a little TV and go to bed. I believe I create “clean copy,” and view that as a strength. But a strength can be a weakness in disguise.

This twin business shouldn’t surprise me. After all, I am a Gemini.
————

Diana Star Helmer is author of Belles of the Ballpark: A Celebration of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (Summer Game Books, available in paperback and e-book).

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